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Community News

City of Rochester announces Utility Office drive-up window repair, hydrant flushing

The City of Rochester has announced drive-up services for the Utility Office will be altered during upcoming repairs.  The city has also released the schedule for an upcoming flushing of the hydrants.

 

Beginning September 27, the Rochester Utility Office drive-up window will be closed for repairs. The office will still be open for business, but the drive up services will not be available until repairs are complete.

 

The city anticipates drive-up services to be operational by September 30. All payment services are still available, such as: pay by phone, pay online, stop in the lobby, or send by USPS.


Beginning October 4, M.E. Simpson & Company will be performing the semi-annual unidirectional flushing of the city water main lines (process to clean the mains). The work will continue for 30 days, weather permitting.

 

During these dates you may experience cloudy or discolored water at any time. The water is safe to use and drink. Running it longer before use may help to clear it. Avoid washing white clothes while water is discolored.

 

The city apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause, but this does ensure the lines are properly maintained.
 

Streetlight pole work, painting continues in Rochester

The City of Rochester offered this reminder with downtown work continuing:

 

Michiana Contracting is replacing the street light poles in downtown Rochester and repainting the traffic signal poles. The work will continue for 2-3 weeks with weather permitting.

 

During these dates you may experience traffic delays and congestion in the downtown area. Please be extra cautious when driving downtown during this time as there will be workers located in the street.

 

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause as we continue to improve our beautiful downtown streetscape.

Flags to half-staff in remembrance of 9/11

Governor Eric J. Holcomb is directing flags statewide to be flown at half-staff in honor of Patriot Day.

 

Flags should be flown at half-staff from sunrise until sunset on Saturday, Sept. 11.

 

Gov. Holcomb also asks businesses and residents to lower their flags to half-staff in remembrance of the victims of the Sept. 11.

Road closure planned for S.R. 25 seal coating operation

The Indiana Department of Transportation announces a seal coating operation for State Road 25 between Chase Rd and State Road 16 beginning on or after Monday, August 30. 

 

There will be soft road closure of State Road 25 in this location, with local access maintained through traffic control. Motorists should expect delays in the area or seek an alternate route using other state roads. The official detour will follow State Road 16 and State Road 17. 

 

This work should take approximately four days, but the schedule is weather dependent and subject to change. INDOT urges drivers to stay alert near crews and follow traffic directions carefully. Motorists are encouraged to allow extra time when driving through this area and should slow down and drive distraction-free through all work zones.

Efforts underway to install Safe Haven Baby Box in Rochester

The Knights of Columbus Council 5584 of St. Joseph Church in Rochester is leading an initiative to have a Safe Haven Baby Box installed at the fire department located at 2006 East State Road 14 in Rochester.

 

The purpose of the box is to help prevent the illegal and potentially deadly abandonment of infants by raising awareness of the Indiana Safe Haven Law and resources for mothers in crisis. It will be the 74th box in Indiana and the first in Fulton County.

 

Since April 2016, when the first box was installed, there have not been any infant deaths due to abandonment in the state.

 

Per the Indiana.gov website, “The Indiana Safe Haven Law enables a person to give up an unwanted infant anonymously without fear of arrest or prosecution.As long as there are no signs of intentional abuse on the baby, no information is required of the person leaving the baby. Any knowledge of the date of birth, race, parent medical history, child's health or anything that would be useful to the child's caregiver would be greatly appreciated.”

 

Safe Haven Baby Box founder, Monica Kelsey, was abandoned as an infant. It is her mission to raise awareness of Safe Haven Laws and provide baby boxes to enable the anonymous surrender of an infant. Kelsey currently lives in Indiana and is a retired firefighter and medic.

 

How a Baby Box Works

The Safe Haven Baby Box is a safety device that legally permits a motherto surrender her newborn safely, securely and anonymously. The box will be installed in an exterior wall of the fire department. Once a parent opens the exterior door to the baby box, a silent alarm is triggered, and a call goes to police dispatch. After the parent places the newborn into the bassinet inside of the box, a second silent alarm triggers a second alert to dispatch. The parent can push a button or simply close the door which will set off a third alarm and call to dispatch. The exterior door automatically locks, while an interior door allows a medical staff member to safely secure the surrendered newborn. The child is then evaluated and taken to the hospital. The Indiana Department of Child Services will take the baby into custody and Child Protective Services will place the infant with a caregiver.

 

Safe Haven Crisis Hotline

The Safe Haven Crisis Hotline, 1-866-99BABY1,will be prominently displayed on the Safe Haven Baby Box. The hotline provides 24-hour dedicated emergency counseling and support for parents in crisis. The hotline has received over 5,000 calls from every state in America, referred over 500 women to crisis pregnancy centers, assisted in seven adoption referrals, and saved 100 babies by enabling legal Safe Haven surrenders.

 

Fundraising Support Needed

The Knights of Columbus from St. Joseph Catholic Church in Rochester has applied for grants and is seeking the community’s assistance to raise the funds to cover the installation and ongoing expenses related to the baby box. The initial cost is $15,000 and includes the purchase of the Safe Haven Baby Box; labor to install the box, electricity and alarm; and training for emergency personnel. Ongoing expenses estimated at $500 a year include the annual recertification of the box, maintenance, and alarm monitoring service fee. To date, the Knights of Columbus has secured $5,000 in funding via a $2,500 grant from REMC and fundraising efforts. Businesses and individuals are invited to make a tax-deductible contribution to the cause online at  https://secure.qgiv.com/for/bbffsjc or by mailing a check to 2296 Sycamore Drive, Rochester, IN 46975. Checks should be made payable to K of C Baby Box.

 

“The Safe Haven Baby Box is a way for our community to come together to prevent the dangerous abandonment of children. Working together, we can provide this important resource and access to the crisis hotline for local mothers in crisis,” said Andrew “Ike” Halaschak, who is leading the fundraising effort.

Crop report takeaway: 'Indiana crop production doing very well'

Purdue College of Agriculture and Extension and United States Department of Agriculture experts gathered at the Indiana State Fair on Thursday (Aug. 12) to discuss the results of the 2021 USDA crop report and the current status of Indiana’s major cash crops.

Jason Henderson, director of Purdue Extension and senior associate dean of the Purdue College of Agriculture, moderated the discussion among panelists. Panelists were Nathanial Warenski, state statistician of the USDA, NASS, Indiana field office; Dan Quinn, Purdue assistant professor of agronomy and new extension corn specialist; Shaun Casteel, Purdue associate professor of agronomy and extension soybean and small grains specialist; Beth Hall, Indiana State Climatologist; and Jim Mintert, Purdue professor of agricultural economics and director of the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture. 

Indiana corn production is forecasted to reach 1.02 billion bushels this year, which would be a 3.7 % increase from 2020 production. The expected yield is up 3.7% from 2020 at 194 bushels per acre. As of Aug. 1, corn condition was rated 76% good to excellent.

“Indiana corn looks good to great and we hope to keep this trend to finish strong. A few things that stood out to me include disease, specifically tar spot and corn rust, and past saturated conditions that could potentially impact the yield,” Quinn said.

Soybean yield is projected to reach 60 bushels per acre, compared to 58 bushels per acre in 2020. As of Aug. 1, soybean condition was rated 72% good to excellent.

“In terms of the soybeans, this season has been anything but normal. We’ve had wet and drought conditions, affecting the root systems and causing disease. The next 35 days are critical for yield development,” Casteel said.

The panel also discussed the crop market, trade and potential impacts from wildfires.

“We have started seeing some of the impacts of the wildfires, including traveling smoke, which is effective at blocking sunlight,” Hall said.

Mintert said, “Today’s report was a bit of surprise when looking at USDA estimates versus trade. This will be a very positive crop year in terms of income and does lead us to expect positive impacts on cash-rent.”

Henderson ended the discussion by observing: “The main takeaway from this report is that Indiana crop production is doing very well. Other areas of the nation weren’t so fortunate, which will potentially open up market opportunities for Indiana farmers.”

The USDA August Crop Report is available online.

Pierceton, Star City photographers among Indiana Agriculture photo contest winners

Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch and the Indiana State Department of Agriculture announced the winners of the 2021 Indiana Agriculture photo contest. The winning photographs will be displayed in the lieutenant governor’s Family of Business office in Indianapolis.

 

“As I travel across our state I am always awestruck by the beauty of our state’s agricultural landscape from round barns to wildlife and so much more,” Crouch said. “These photos are a wonderful addition to my business office’s walls and serve as a wonderful reminder of the strength and beauty of Indiana agriculture.”

 

The winning photos were chosen from hundreds of entries in the following four categories: Agritourism, Conservation, Faces of Agriculture and On the Farm. Two winners were selected from each category, along with two winners overall.

 

To be considered, the photo had to be taken in the state by an Indiana resident. The photos were evaluated by a panel of independent judges based on creativity, composition and category representation.

 

“I am so grateful for each of the photographers who submitted their photos in this year’s contest,” said Bruce Kettler, director of the Indiana State Department of Agriculture. “Each of the submissions truly captured the essence of rural life and the important role agriculture plays in our state. Thank you for using your talent to showcase Indiana’s agriculture industry.”

 

The following list includes the photo contest winners for 2021:

Agritourism Category

  • “Pollination” by Amber Beams from Roachdale
  • “Magical Midway” by Jenise Stewart from Nabb

Conservation Category

  • “Last Light” by Sarah Greene from Loogootee
  • “The Coneflower Bee” by Sarah Sands from Pierceton

Faces of Agriculture Category

  • “4-H” by Andi Pollert from Seymour
  • “Farmer Frank” by Beth Legge from Moores Hill

On the Farm Category

  • “Among the Flowers” by Cecile Dreyer from Sellersburg
  • “Bushels of Fire” by Tom Jones from Star City

Overall Category

  • “Nature’s Unicorn” by Kyle Doles from Indianapolis
  • “Newborn” by Ross Waitt from Sheridan

Troopers focus on Back to School safety

As the summer break comes to an end, students across  Indiana are starting their return back to school next week.  With that return to school, the Indiana State Police would remind all motorists to be focused on traffic safety during morning and afternoon commutes.

Motorists should be prepared to experience an increased amount of school bus traffic and pedestrian children walking to and from their bus stops and schools during the early morning and mid-afternoon hours. Motorists should plan your commutes accordingly to allow for extended travel time during these periods. Special attention should be given to the posted reduced School Zone speed limits, and for school buses regularly stopping or standing to load or unload students. Children are often unpredictable and may dart out in front of vehicular traffic unexpectedly!

Indiana traffic law requires motorists to the operate in a safe and responsible manner when approaching a stopped or standing school bus according to the following rules:

  • When approaching a school bus from any direction, which is stopped and has its red lights flashing and stop arm extended, motorists are required to STOP, even on multiple lane highways where there is no barrier or median separating lanes of traffic.
  • Motorists on a highway that is divided by a barrier, such as cable barrier, concrete wall, or grassy median, are required to stop only if they are traveling in the same direction as the school bus.
  • Always be prepared to stop for a school bus and watch for children. Children are unpredictable. Not only is disregarding a school bus stop arm dangerous, it is a serious offense.

The Indiana State Police is committed to the safety of our children by keeping Indiana’s roadways safer through education and enforcement patrols.  Please join us by doing your part to make travel on our Indiana roadways safer for all Hoosier students throughout the school year.

Rochester Optimist Club announces an IN North District W.O.W. event

The Optimist Club of Rochester is excited to announce the IN North Optimist District’s “Roarin’ 20’s PROM” welcoming positive minded people to an evening of fun and Optimism.

Don’t miss out on being an integral part of this very first W.O.W event. W.O.W. stands for Welcome Optimists Worldwide and is a great chance for the community to learn about an Optimist Club in a fun manner. The District will be honored to have the Optimist International President Mark Weinsoff in attendance.

The event will be held on Friday, August 13 with opening festivities starting at 6:00 pm, the banquet at 6:30 pm followed by the Prom starting at 8:00 pm. All will be held at the Fulton County Historical Society located at 37 E 375 N Rochester, IN. 46975. The catered meal is by ticket reservations only and costs $26 per person. The dance is free of charge to IN North District Optimist Club Members and one guest. Additional guests and other community members are $10 each. In lieu of $10, bring a BAG of groceries to donate to Matthew's Market! Concessions will be provided during the dance by the Boy Scouts Troop 219.

The deadline to purchase dinner tickets is Monday, August 9.

“With this event, we hope to be able to gain more valuable members who will help build our clubs which supports children of the community who need it most” said IN North Optimist District’s Governor, Becky Mahoney.

The Optimist Club of Rochester has been supporting local youth since 1978. Other programs and service projects that the Club is involved in can be found at indiananorthdistrict.org

Optimist International is one of the world’s largest service club organizations with over 80,000 adult and youth members in almost 3,000 clubs in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean and Mexico and throughout the world. Carrying the motto “Bringing Out the Best in Youth, in our Communities, and in Ourselves,” Optimists conduct positive service projects that reach more than six million young people each year. To learn more about Optimist International, please call (314) 371-6000 or visit the organization’s website at www.optimist.org.

For more information about the event, please call IN North District Governor Becky Mahoney at 574-529-3266 or email indn4optimists@gmail.com.

State Road 10 to be closed to replace culverts

The Indiana Department of Transportation announces a road closure for State Road 10 between Pear Rd and Queen Rd beginning Monday, August 2 through Thursday, August 5.

Maintenance units will be replacing culverts in several locations along the roadway. 

Motorists should seek an alternate route. The official detour will follow State Road 17, State Road 110 and U.S. 31. 

Dark mode may not save your phone's battery life as much as you think, but there are a few silver linings

When Android and Apple operating system updates started giving users the option to put their smartphones in dark mode, the feature showed potential for saving the battery life of newer phones with screens that allow darker-colored pixels to use less power than lighter-colored pixels.

 

But dark mode is unlikely to make a big difference to battery life with the way that most people use their phones on a daily basis, says a new study by Purdue University researchers.

 

That doesn’t mean that dark mode can’t be helpful, though.

 

“When the industry rushed to adopt dark mode, it didn’t have the tools yet to accurately measure power draw by the pixels,” said Charlie Hu, Purdue’s Michael and Katherine Birck Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering. “But now we’re able to give developers the tools they need to give users more energy-efficient apps.”

 

Based on their findings using these tools they built, the researchers clarify the facts about the effects of dark mode on battery life and recommend ways that users can already take better advantage of the feature’s power savings.

 

The study looked at six of the most-downloaded apps on Google Play: Google Maps, Google News, Google Phone, Google Calendar, YouTube and Calculator. The researchers analyzed how dark mode affects 60 seconds of activity within each of these apps on the Pixel 2, Moto Z3, Pixel 4 and Pixel 5.

 

Even though Hu’s team studied only Android apps and phones, their findings might have similar implications for Apple phones, starting with the iPhone X. The team recently presented this work at MobiSys 2021, a conference by the Association for Computing Machinery.

 

Fact: Dark mode only makes a noticeable difference to battery life in certain scenarios

Smartphones that came out after 2017 likely have an OLED (organic light-emitting diode) screen. Because this type of screen doesn’t have a backlight like the LCD (liquid crystal display) screens of older phones, the screen will draw less power when displaying dark-colored pixels. OLED displays also allow phone screens to be ultrathin, flexible and foldable.

 

But the brightness of OLED screens largely determines how much dark mode saves battery life, said Hu, who has been researching ways to improve the energy efficiency of smartphones since they first hit the market over a decade ago. The software tools that Hu and his team have developed are based on new patent-pending power modeling technology they invented to more accurately estimate the power draw of OLED phone displays.

 

Many people use their phone’s default auto-brightness setting, which tends to keep brightness levels around 30%-40% most of the time when indoors. At 30%-50% brightness, Purdue researchers found that switching from light mode to dark mode saves only 3%-9% power on average for several different OLED smartphones.

 

This percentage is so small that most users wouldn’t notice the slightly longer battery life. But the higher the brightness when switching from light mode to dark mode, the higher the energy savings.

 

Scenario 1: Switching from light mode to dark mode on a sunny day

Let’s say that you’re using your OLED phone in light mode while sitting outside watching a baseball game on a bright and sunny day. If your phone is set to automatically adjust brightness levels, then the screen has probably become really bright, which drains battery life.

 

The Purdue study found that switching from light mode to dark mode at 100% brightness saves an average of 39%-47% battery power. So turning on dark mode while your phone’s screen is that bright could allow your phone to last a lot longer than if you had stayed in light mode.

 

Other tests done by the industry haven’t analyzed as many apps or phones as Hu’s team did to determine the effects of dark mode on battery life – and they were using less accurate methods.

 

“Tests done in the past to compare the effects of light mode with dark mode on battery life have treated the phone as a black box, lumping in OLED display with the phone’s other gazillion components. Our tool can accurately isolate the portion of battery drain by the OLED display,” said Pranab Dash, a Purdue Ph.D. student who worked with Hu on the study.

 

Scenario 2: Using dark mode to go easier on your eyes without draining your phone’s battery faster

Typically, increasing your phone’s brightness drains its battery faster – no matter if you are in light mode or dark mode. But since conducting this study, Dash has collected data indicating that lower brightness levels in light mode result in the same power draw as higher brightness levels in dark mode.

 

Using the Google News app in light mode at 20% brightness on the Pixel 5, for example, draws the same amount of power as when the phone is at 50% brightness in dark mode.

 

So if looking at your phone in dark mode is easier on your eyes, but you need the higher brightness to see better, you don’t have to worry about this brightness level taking more of a toll on your phone’s battery life.

Coming soon: Apps designed with dark mode energy savings in mind

Hu and his team built a tool that app developers can use to determine the energy savings of a certain activity in dark mode as they design an app. The tool, called a Per-Frame OLED Power Profiler (PFOP), is based on the more accurate OLED power model that the team developed. The Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization has applied for a patent on this power modeling technology. Both PFOP and the power modeling technology are available for licensing.

 

Fact: Your phone doesn’t accurately measure battery usage by the app – yet

Both Android and Apple phones come with a way to look at how much battery power each individual app is consuming. You can access this feature in the settings of Android and Apple phones.

 

The feature can give you a rough idea of the most power-hungry apps, but Hu and Dash found that Android’s current “Battery” feature is oblivious to content on a screen, meaning it doesn’t consider the impact of dark mode on power consumption.

 

Coming soon: More accurate estimates of your apps’ battery usage

Hu’s team has developed a more accurate way to calculate battery consumption by the app for Android, and actually used the tool to make the study’s findings about how much power dark mode saves at certain brightness levels. Unlike Android’s current feature, this new tool takes into account the effects of dark mode on battery life.

 

The tool, called Android Battery+, is expected to become available to platform vendors and app developers in the coming year.

Indiana farmland prices hit record high in 2021

The Purdue Farmland Value and Cash Rents Survey suggests farmland prices across Indiana have risen to all-time highs in June of 2021.

 

Statewide, top quality farmland averaged $9,785 per acre, up 14.1% from the same time last year. The high growth rate for top-quality farmland was closely followed by the growth in average- and poor-quality farmland prices, which increased by 12.5% (to $8,144) and 12.1% (to $6,441), respectively. Across all land quality classes, 2021 per-acre farmland prices exceeded the previous records set in 2014.

 

“A unique combination of economic forces, including net farm income, expected income growth, crop and livestock prices, interest rates, exports, inflation, alternative investments, U.S. policy, and farmers’ liquidity, all played a major factor in the price increase we’re experiencing,” said Todd H. Kuethe, Purdue associate professor and the Schrader Endowed Chair in Farmland Economics and survey author.

 

That’s rare, he said.

 

“Normally we’ll see positive price pressure from one or two market forces; however, this June, survey respondents indicated that all 10 forces we asked them about were putting upward pressure on land values,” he said.

 

Statewide cash rental rates increased across all land quality classes in 2021. Average rental rates increased by 3.9% for top-quality land, from $259 to $269 per acre. The cash rental rates for average- and poor-quality lands both increased by 4.6% to $227 and $183, respectively. At the regional level, the largest rental rate increases for top- and average-quality land were both in the Southeast region (11.5% and 6.4%), and the largest rental rate increases for poor-quality land were in the North region (5.5%). Across all three land-quality classes, the highest per-acre cash rent was observed in the West Central region.

 

Rent as a share of June land value decreased slightly in 2021, suggesting that cash rental rates appreciated slower than farmland prices. Some portion of the difference in appreciation rates between farmland values and cash rents may reflect changes in expectations between fall 2020, when 2021 rents were negotiated, and the 2021 growing season.

 

For more in-depth analysis on the survey, the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture will host a free webinar from 12:30-1:30 p.m. ET Aug. 20. Join Purdue agricultural economists Kuethe, James Mintert and Michael Langemeier as they break down the Purdue Farmland Values Survey and USDA Land Values report, discuss marketing strategies for 2021 corn and soybean crops, and make projections for 2022 corn and soybean returns. Register for free.

 

The department of agricultural economics conducts the Purdue Farmland Value and Cash Rent Survey each June and publishes it in the Purdue Agricultural Economics Report. The survey is produced through the cooperation of numerous professionals knowledgeable of Indiana’s farmland market. These professionals provided an estimate of the market value for bare- poor-, average-, and top-quality farmland in last December and June, and a forecast value for this coming December.

IRS Criminal Investigation warns taxpayers about Child Tax Credit scams

The Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation Division is warning taxpayers about Child Tax Credit-related scams, which criminals may use to steal money and personal information.

 

While millions of American families started receiving the advance Child Tax Credit payments last week, criminals were already looking for innovative tactics to take advantage of unwitting victims.

Taxpayers should be on the lookout for a variety of phone, e-mail, text message and social media scams targeting families eligible for the credit. Any communication offering assistance to sign up for the Child Tax Credit or to speed up the monthly payments is likely a scam.

When receiving unsolicited calls or messages, taxpayers should not provide personal information, click on links, or open attachments as this may lead to money loss, tax-related fraud, and identity theft.  

 

“As the country continues to  grapple with the financial fall-out of the COVID-19 pandemic, scammers and criminals continue to evolve their efforts to steal the assistance the government provides, from those that need it the most,” said Acting Special Agent In Charge, Donald “Trey” Eakins, IRS Criminal Investigation, Chicago Field Office. “Be aware of those that try to steal the tax credit that you are entitled to, and if an offer sounds too good to be true, it probably is,”

 

Although scammers constantly come up with new schemes to try and catch taxpayers off-guard, there are simple ways to identify if it is truly the IRS reaching out.

  • The IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers via e-mail, text messages, or social media channels to request personal or financial information, even information related to the Child Tax Credit.
  • The IRS does not leave pre-recorded, urgent, or threatening messages. Aggressive calls warning taxpayers about a lawsuit or arrest are fake.
  • The IRS will not call taxpayers asking them to provide or verify financial information so they can obtain the monthly Child Tax Credit payments.
  • The IRS will not ask for payment via a gift card, wire transfer or cryptocurrency.

 

If you are eligible for advance payments of the Child Tax Credit, the IRS will use information from your 2020 or 2019 tax return to automatically enroll you for advance payments. Taxpayers do not have to take any additional action. Taxpayers who are not required to file a tax return or who have not provided the IRS their information, may visit IRS.gov/childtaxcredit2021 to provide basic information for the Child Tax Credit.

 

To report suspicious IRS-related phishing and online scams, visit IRS.gov.

Fulton County 4H Fair - Poultry results

Poultry Show

  • 4-H Classes
    • Eggs
      • Grand: Kinzlee Kelly
      • Reserve Grand: Kinzlee Kelly
    • Commercial Chickens (Egg Layers)
      • Grand: Adrian Schouten
      • Reserve Grand: Erika Yard
    • Market Meat Pen Chickens
      • Grand: Jessica Taylor
      • Reserve Grand: Kinzlee Kelly
    • Commercial Ducks
      • Grand: Kinzlee Kelly
      • Reserve Grand: Gavin Young
    • Commercial Turkeys
      • Grand: Austin Edmondson
      • Reserve Grand: Grace Edmondson
    • Exhibition Waterfowl
      • Grand: Hunter Conley
      • Reserve Grand: Aiden Kimble
    • Exhibition Breeding Pair Waterfowl
      • Grand: Addison Conrad
      • Reserve Grand: Kinzlee Kelly
    • Exhibition Chicken
      • Grand: Jaxson Elliott
      • Reserve Grand: Jessica Taylor
    • Exhibition Breeding Pair Chicken
      • Grand: Jessica Taylor
      • Reserve Grand: Jessica Taylor

 

  • Exhibition Breeding Pair Guinea Fowl
    • Grand: Jessica Taylor
    • Reserve Grand: Kirsten Taylor
  • Showmanship
    • Beginner: Addison Conrad
    • Junior: Kirsten Taylor
    • Senior: Erika Yard

Master: Haley Jones

Fulton County 4-H Results -- Community Building

 

Fulton County 4-H Results--Community Building
Exhibitor First Name Exhibitor Last Name Project Class Awards Class Ribbon Class Awards
Amanda Evers Achievement Record 600002 : Achievement Records Grades 6-12   Blue Champion
Samantha Jacobs Aerospace (AE) 11011: Grade 3-5, Rocket, Stage 2 (AE)   Blue  
Vivian Miller Aerospace (AE) 11021: Grade 6-8, Rocket, Stage 3 (AE)   Blue  
Abigail Owens Aerospace (AE) 11031: Grade 9-12, Rocket, Stage 4 (AE)   Blue  
Carter moss Aquatic Science 600102 : Beginner One to Five Gallon Aquarium Grand Champion Blue Champion
Lindy Armstrong Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Hayley Backus Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR)   Blue State Fair Entry
Addisyn Banks Arts and Crafts (CR) 12012: Needle Craft (CR)   Blue  
Alison Bauman Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue State Fair Entry
Emma Bays Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR) Reserve Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Sophie Beehler Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR)   Blue  
McKinley Burton Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue State Fair Entry
Lyla Clauson Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Lindsey Coon Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Lillie Dickson Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Jadyn Field Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR)   Blue  
Sadie  Flenar  Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Sadie  Flenar  Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR)   Blue  
Parker Fultz Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Evan Harsh Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR)   Blue State Fair Entry
Reuben Helt Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Anne Horban Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR) Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Anne Horban Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Samantha Jacobs Arts and Crafts (CR) 12013: Model Craft (CR)   Blue Champion
Isabella Jones Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Isabella Jones Arts and Crafts (CR) 12012: Needle Craft (CR) Reserve Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Kade Jones Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue State Fair Entry
Aubrey Long Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Alexa Lowe Arts and Crafts (CR) 12012: Needle Craft (CR) Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Chaney Miller Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR) Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Aisley Montel Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Avarie Montel Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue State Fair Entry
Collette Ott Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Abigail Owens Arts and Crafts (CR) 12013: Model Craft (CR)   Blue Champion
Hunter Pace Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR)   Blue  
Hunter Pace Arts and Crafts (CR) 12013: Model Craft (CR)   Blue Champion
Hunter Pace Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Bria Rensberger Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR) Reserve Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry
Jessica Taylor Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Jessica Taylor Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Kirsten Taylor Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Kirsten Taylor Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR)   Blue  
Kirsten Taylor Arts and Crafts (CR) 12011: Fine Art (CR)   Blue  
Megan Uhrich Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Kelsie Wolf Arts and Crafts (CR) 12014: Any Other Craft (CR)   Blue  
Josiah Helt Books 600303 : Books Advanced grades 7-12 Grand Champion Blue Champion
Erika Yard Books 600303 : Books Advanced grades 7-12 Reserve Grand Champion Blue Champion
Colton Baker Bottle Rockets 600401 : Bottle Rockets Division 1   Blue Reserve Champion
McKenzie Craft Bottle Rockets 600403 : Bottle Rockets Division 3   Blue Reserve Champion
Joshua DeSonia Bottle Rockets 600401 : Bottle Rockets Division 1   Red  
Warner dubois Bottle Rockets 600401 : Bottle Rockets Division 1   Red  
Austin Edmondson Bottle Rockets 600401 : Bottle Rockets Division 1   Red  
Grace Edmondson Bottle Rockets 600402 : Bottle Rockets Division 2   Red  
Sadie  Flenar  Bottle Rockets 600401 : Bottle Rockets Division 1 Reserve Grand Champion Blue Champion
Evan Harsh Bottle Rockets 600403 : Bottle Rockets Division 3 Grand Champion Blue Champion
Kylie Haselby Bottle Rockets 600402 : Bottle Rockets Division 2   Blue Champion
Shelby Haselby Bottle Rockets 600401 : Bottle Rockets Division 1   Blue  
Kaleb Howard-See Bottle Rockets 600402 : Bottle Rockets Division 2   Red  
Samantha Jacobs Bottle Rockets 600401 : Bottle Rockets Division 1   Red  
Abigail Owens Bottle Rockets 600403 : Bottle Rockets Division 3   Blue  
Hayley Bright Cake Decorating (CK) 14011: Grade 3-5, Beginner (CK)   Red  
Emmie Lowe Cake Decorating (CK) 14011: Grade 3-5, Beginner (CK)   Blue Reserve Champion
Jessica Taylor Cake Decorating (CK) 14021: Grade 6-8, Intermediate (CK) Grand Champion Blue Champion
Kirsten Taylor Cake Decorating (CK) 14011: Grade 3-5, Beginner (CK)   Blue Champion
Addisyn Banks Cat Poster (CP) 15011: Grade 3-5, Level 1 (CP) Reserve Grand Champion Blue Champion
Emma Bays Cat Poster (CP) 15021: Grade 6-8, Level 2 (CP)   Blue Champion
Kaylee DeSonia Cat Poster (CP) 15031: Grade 9-12, Level 3 (CP) Grand Champion Blue Champion
Anne Horban Cat Poster (CP) 15021: Grade 6-8, Level 2 (CP)   Blue Reserve Champion
Hunter Pace Cat Poster (CP) 15021: Grade 6-8, Level 2 (CP)   Blue  
Kirsten Taylor Cat Poster (CP) 15011: Grade 3-5, Level 1 (CP)   Blue Reserve Champion
Amanda Evers Child Development (CD) 16041: Grade 10-12, Level D (CD) Grand Champion Blue Champion
Joshua DeSonia Collections 600602 : Collections Level B Grades 5-6   Blue Champion
Kaylee DeSonia Collections 600603 : Collections Level C Grades 7-9   Blue Reserve Champion
Layla Dickson Collections 600601 : Collections Level A Grades 3-4   Blue Champion
Amanda Evers Collections 600604 : Collections Level D Grades10-12   Blue Reserve Champion
Kaleb Howard-See Collections 600602 : Collections Level B Grades 5-6   Blue  
Vivian Miller Collections 600602 : Collections Level B Grades 5-6   Blue Reserve Champion
Ava Thomas Collections 600603 : Collections Level C Grades 7-9 Reserve Grand Champion Blue Champion
Dryden Vance Collections 600604 : Collections Level D Grades10-12 Grand Champion Blue Champion
Colton Baker Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue  
Carter Bauman Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue  
Brayden Calvert Construction Models (Legos) 602102: Construction Models - Grades 6-8   Blue  
Lane Coby Construction Models (Legos) 602103: Construction Models - Grades 9-12 Reserve Grand Champion Blue Champion
Lindsey Coon Construction Models (Legos) 602102: Construction Models - Grades 6-8   Blue  
Lucas Coon Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue  
Joshua DeSonia Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue Reserve Champion
Warner dubois Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue  
Jadyn Field Construction Models (Legos) 602102: Construction Models - Grades 6-8   Blue  
Terry Grossman Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue  
Josiah Helt Construction Models (Legos) 602102: Construction Models - Grades 6-8 Grand Champion Blue Champion
Kaleb Howard-See Construction Models (Legos) 602102: Construction Models - Grades 6-8   Blue  
Levi Johnson Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue  
Mason Metzger Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue  
Naomi Miller Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5      
Collette Ott Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue  
Hunter Pace Construction Models (Legos) 602102: Construction Models - Grades 6-8   Blue Reserve Champion
Kirsten Taylor Construction Models (Legos) 602101: Construction Models -  Grades 3-5   Blue Champion
Lillie Dickson Consumer Clothing (CC) 18011: Grade 3-5, Beginner (CC)   Blue Champion
Addison Nelson Consumer Clothing (CC) 18021: Grade 6-8, Intermediate (CC) Grand Champion Blue Champion
Lindy Armstrong Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue  
Grant Clark Crops 600830 : Soybeans   Blue  
Grant Clark Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue  
Mitchell Clark Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue  
Mitchell Clark Crops 600830 : Soybeans   Blue  
Lyla Clauson Crops 600830 : Soybeans   Blue Reserve Champion
Lyla Clauson Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue Champion
Amanda Evers Crops 600811 : Hay   Blue Reserve Champion
Caleb Gardner Crops 600820 : Silage   Blue Reserve Champion
Caleb Gardner Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue  
Gretchen Gardner Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue  
Gretchen Gardner Crops 600820 : Silage   Blue  
Gretchen Gardner Crops 600830 : Soybeans   Red  
James Gardner Crops 600830 : Soybeans   Red  
James Gardner Crops 600820 : Silage   Blue Champion
James Gardner Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue  
Ashley Haselby Crops 600830 : Soybeans   Blue  
Ashley Haselby Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue  
Kade Jones Crops 600811 : Hay   Blue Champion
Maggie Smith Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue  
Maggie Smith Crops 600811 : Hay   Blue  
Maggie Smith Crops 600830 : Soybeans   Blue Champion
Emily Vigar Crops 600830 : Soybeans   Blue  
Emily Vigar Crops 600801 : Corn   Blue Reserve Champion
Emily Vigar Crops 600840 : Wheat   Blue Champion
Addisyn Banks Cupcake Decorating 6008.10: Beginner Grades 3-5 Grand Champion Blue Champion
Chaney Miller Cupcake Decorating 6008.10: Beginner Grades 3-5   Blue  
Chesnee Miller Cupcake Decorating 6008.12: Advanced Grades 9-12   Blue  
Jessica Taylor Cupcake Decorating 6008.11: Intermediate Grades 6-8   Blue Champion
Kirsten Taylor Cupcake Decorating 6008.10: Beginner Grades 3-5   Blue  
Emma Bays Do Your Own Thing 602202: Do Your Own Thing - Intermediate   Blue  
McKendyll Bradley Do Your Own Thing 602203: Do Your Own Thing - Advanced   Blue Reserve Champion
McKenzie Bradley Do Your Own Thing 602203: Do Your Own Thing - Advanced   Blue  
Amanda Evers Do Your Own Thing 602203: Do Your Own Thing - Advanced   Blue Champion
Avarie Montel Do Your Own Thing 602202: Do Your Own Thing - Intermediate Reserve Grand Champion Blue Champion
Collette Ott Do Your Own Thing 602201: Do Your Own Thing - Beginner Grand Champion Blue Champion
Jessica Taylor Do Your Own Thing 602202: Do Your Own Thing - Intermediate   Blue Reserve Champion
Mitchell Clark Dog Poster (DP) 20011: Grade 3-5, Level 1 (DP) Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
MadiLynn Coble Dog Poster (DP) 20021: Grade 6-8, Level 2 (DP)   Blue Reserve Champion
Katelyn Conliff Dog Poster (DP) 20011: Grade 3-5, Level 1 (DP)   Blue  
Joshua DeSonia Dog Poster (DP) 20011: Grade 3-5, Level 1 (DP)   Blue Reserve Champion
Ava Helt Dog Poster (DP) 20011: Grade 3-5, Level 1 (DP)   Blue  
Anne Horban Dog Poster (DP) 20021: Grade 6-8, Level 2 (DP)   Blue  
Chase Miller Dog Poster (DP) 20031: Grade 9-12, Level 3 (DP)   Blue  
Haley Robison Dog Poster (DP) 20031: Grade 9-12, Level 3 (DP)   Blue Reserve Champion
Abriella St.Martin Dog Poster (DP) 20021: Grade 6-8, Level 2 (DP) Reserve Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Megan Uhrich Dog Poster (DP) 20011: Grade 3-5, Level 1 (DP)   Blue  
Elizabeth Weaver Dog Poster (DP) 20031: Grade 9-12, Level 3 (DP)   Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Alison Bauman Electric (EL) 21021: Level 2 (EL)   Blue Reserve Champion
Aubrey Bauman Electric (EL) 21011: Level1 (EL)   Blue Reserve Champion
Carter Bauman Electric (EL) 21021: Level 2 (EL)   Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Sydney Bauman Electric (EL) 21041: Level 4 (EL)   Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Grant Bolinger Electric (EL) 21011: Level1 (EL)   Blue  
Brayden Calvert Electric (EL) 21051: Level 5 Electric (EL)   Blue Reserve Champion
Lindsey Coon Electric (EL) 21031: Level 3 (EL)   Blue Reserve Champion
Lucas Coon Electric (EL) 21031: Level 3 (EL) Reserve Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Joshua DeSonia Electric (EL) 21031: Level 3 (EL)   Blue  
Andrew Douglass Electric (EL) 21021: Level 2 (EL)   Blue  
Parker Fultz Electric (EL) 21011: Level1 (EL)   Blue  
Reuben Helt Electric (EL) 21021: Level 2 (EL)   Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Aaron Johnson Electric (EL) 21041: Level 4 (EL)   Blue  
Levi Johnson Electric (EL) 21011: Level1 (EL)   Blue Champion
Kade Jones Electric (EL) 21011: Level1 (EL)   Blue  
Tanner krom Electric (EL) 21041: Level 4 (EL)   Blue Reserve Champion
Daniel Yocum Electric (EL) 21051: Level 5 Electric (EL) Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Warner dubois Entomology (EN) 22011: Grade 3, 10 Insect Collection (EN)   Red  
Brayden Calvert Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602305: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 5 Grade 7   Blue  
Amanda Evers Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602308: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 8 Grade 10   Blue  
Caleb Gardner Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602307: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 7 Grade 9   Blue  
James Gardner Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602306: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 6 Grade 8   Blue  
Jacob Greer Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602301: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 1 Grade 3   Blue  
Terry Grossman Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602303: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 3 Grade 5   Blue  
Macee Hinderlider Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602307: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 7 Grade 9 Reserve Grand Champion Blue Reserve Champion
Alexa Lowe Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602305: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 5 Grade 7   Blue Reserve Champion
Emmie Lowe Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602303: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 3 Grade 5   Blue Reserve Champion
Kyler Lowe Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602308: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 8 Grade 10 Grand Champion Blue Champion
Grayson Miller Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602303: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 3 Grade 5   Blue Champion
Nicholas Schouten Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602303: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 3 Grade 5   Blue  
Brayden Unger-Overmyer Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602304: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 4 Grade 6   Blue  
Chas Warpenburg Farm and Construction Toy Scene 602305: Farm and Construction Toy Scene - Division 5 Grade 7   Blue Champion
Lindsey Coon Fashion Revue (FR) 2304: Grade 6 Wearable   Blue Champion
Lucas Coon Fashion Revue (FR) 2303: Grade 5 Wearable   Blue  
Gretchen Gardner Fashion Revue (FR) 2303: Grade 5 Wearable   Blue  
Aubrey Long Fashion Revue (FR) 2303: Grade 5 Wearable   Blue Reserve Champion
Emily Vigar Fashion Revue (FR) 23012: Grade 8-12, Dress Up (FR)   Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Hayley Backus Floriculture (FL) 24045: Grade 10-12, Level D, Centerpiece  (FL)   Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Emma Bays Floriculture (FL) 24034: Grade 7-9, Level C, One Corsage or Two Boutonnieres Silk or Artificial Flowers (FL)   Red  
Chloe Conley Floriculture (FL) 24031: Grade 7-9, Level ,C Terrarium (FL)   Blue  
Madisyn Douglass Floriculture (FL) 24023: Grade 5-6, Level B, House Plant (FL)   Blue Reserve Champion
Anne Horban Floriculture (FL) 24023: Grade 5-6, Level B, House Plant (FL)   Blue  
Mariah Leininger Floriculture (FL) 24042: Grade 10-12, Level D, Seasonal Arrangement Fresh and-or Artificial Flowers (FL) Reserve Grand Champion Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Aisley Montel Floriculture (FL) 24012: Grade 3-4, Level A, Flower Arrangement Bud Vase Purchased Flowers (FL)   Blue State Fair Entry, Champion
Avarie Montel Floriculture (FL) 24036: Grade 7-9, Level C, Flower Arrangement Roses or Lillies (FL) Reserve Grand Champion Blue

SR 110 to be closed east of U.S. 31

The Indiana Department of Transportation announces a road closure for State Road 110 between C.R. 100 E/Iris Rd and C.R. 200 E/Hawthorn Rd beginning Monday, July 19.

 

EWR Railroad will be rebuilding their at grade railroad crossing in this location. The road will be closed for approximately four days, weather permitting.

 

Motorists should seek an alternate route. The official detour will follow U.S. 31, State Road 14 and State Road 25.

USDA to provide pandemic assistance to livestock producers for animal losses

Livestock and poultry producers who suffered losses during the pandemic due to insufficient access to processing can apply for assistance for those losses and the cost of depopulation and disposal of the animals. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Vilsack announced the Pandemic Livestock Indemnity Program (PLIP) in [recorded] remarks at the National Pork Industry Conference in Wisconsin Dells, WI.  The announcement is part of USDA’s Pandemic Assistance for Producers initiative. Livestock and poultry producers can apply for assistance through USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) July 20 through Sept. 17, 2021.

 

The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, authorized payments to producers for losses of livestock or poultry depopulated from March 1, 2020 through December 26, 2020, due to insufficient processing access as a result of the pandemic. PLIP payments will be based on 80% of the fair market value of the livestock and poultry and for the cost of depopulation and disposal of the animal. Eligible livestock and poultry include swine, chickens and turkeys, but pork producers are expected to be the primary recipients of the assistance.

“Throughout the pandemic, we learned very quickly the importance and vulnerability of the supply chain to our food supply,” said Agriculture Secretary Vilsack. “Many livestock producers had to make the unfortunate decision to depopulate their livestock inventory when there simply was no other option. This targeted assistance will help livestock and poultry producers that were among the hardest hit by the pandemic alleviate some financial burden from these losses.”

 

Additional Assistance Planned

 

The previous administration proposed pandemic assistance using flat rates across the industry, which does not take into account the different levels of harm felt by different producers. Pork industry supported analysis projected that disruptions in processing capacity in the pork supply chain create a situation with small hog producers and especially those that sell on the spot market or negotiate prices, bear a disproportionate share of losses. USDA has examined the difference between the negotiated prices for hogs and the 5-year average and documented a significant drop during April through September of 2020 due to the pandemic. USDA has set aside up to $50 million in pandemic assistance funds to provide additional assistance for small hog producers that use the spot market or negotiate prices. Details on the additional targeted assistance are expected to be available this summer.

 

 

PLIP Program Details

 

Eligible livestock must have been depopulated from March 1, 2020 through December 26, 2020, due to insufficient processing access as a result of the pandemic. Livestock must have been physically located in the U.S. or a territory of the U.S. at the time of depopulation.

Eligible livestock owners include persons or legal entities who, as of the day the eligible livestock was depopulated, had legal ownership of the livestock. Packers, live poultry dealers and contract growers are not eligible for PLIP.

PLIP payments compensate participants for 80% of both the loss of the eligible livestock or poultry and for the cost of depopulation and disposal based on a single payment rate per head.  PLIP payments will be calculated by multiplying the number of head of eligible livestock or poultry by the payment rate per head, and then subtracting the amount of any payments the eligible livestock or poultry owner has received for disposal of the livestock or poultry under the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) or a state program. The payments will also be reduced by any Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP 1 and 2) payments paid on the same inventory of swine that were depopulated.

 

There is no per person or legal entity payment limitation on PLIP payments. To be eligible for payments, a person or legal entity must have an average adjusted gross income (AGI) of less than $900,000 for tax years 2016, 2017 and 2018.

 

Applying for Assistance

 

Eligible livestock and poultry producers can apply for PLIP starting July 20, 2021, by completing the FSA-620, Pandemic Livestock Indemnity Program application, and submitting it to any FSA county office. Additional documentation may be required. Visit farmers.gov/plip for a copy of the Notice of Funding Availability and more information on how to apply.

 

Applications can be submitted to the FSA office at any USDA Service Center nationwide by mail, fax, hand delivery or via electronic means. To find your local FSA office, visit farmers.gov/service-locator. Livestock and poultry producers can also call 877-508-8364 to speak directly with a USDA employee ready to offer assistance.

Fulton County Homemaker's Open Class winners

Homemaker’s Open Class winners at the Fulton County 4-H Fair:

 

Michaela Slisher—Photography

Jenna Burton—Arts & Crafts

Bernadette Pohlmann—Christmas at the Fair and Quilting

Anna Packer—Needle Arts

Karin Fowler—Flowers

Sue Dove—Baked Goods

Leah Hinderlider—Food Preservation.

 

Fulton County 4-H Fair Monday schedule

Monday activities at the Fulton County 4-H Fair:

 

5 - 9 pm, Blue Grass Rides on the Midway

 

5:30 pm, Registration for Kiddy Pedal Pull on west side of Everett Smith Building.  Pedal pull begins at 6 pm.

 

6:00 - 9:00 pm, Smoke House Fire Safety / Evacuation - Midway Area

 

6:30 pm, Horse & Pony Equitation Classes.

 

Parking is free today - sponsored by RTC Communications.

Additional COVID-19 relief coming to Fulton County United Way

Fulton County United Way is pleased to announce that it will receive a second COVID-19 Economic Relief Initiative grantfor $57,968 from Indiana United Ways, the state professional association of which Fulton County United Way is a member.  The grant will be used to support our community in meeting basic human needs brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

The grant is one of 47 grants that Indiana United Ways is making to member organizations and community foundations through the initiative, which was made possible by funding Indiana United Ways received from Lilly Endowment Inc.

 

“Fulton County United Way has been a key convener and coordinator of our community’s response to meet human needs for decades. Even before this crisis, we knew that 13% families in Fulton County were not able to make ends meet - despite working. In the wake of COVID, those needs became even more dire. Thanks to the generous, continued support of Lilly Endowmentto our State Association, we can continue to help our community, through nonprofit partners, deal with and hopefully resolve the impacts of this trying time,” said Jenny Moriarty Executive Director for Fulton County United Way.

 

The second COVID-19 Economic Relief Initiative grantagain calls for United Ways that receive funding to leverage partnerships and relationships to better meet COVID-related basic needs alignedwith the social determinants of health as defined by the CDC.  Specifically, Fulton County United Way plans to use the ERI funds that will directly impact families and / or individuals from Fulton County that meet the ALICE guidelines, as well as those on low fixed income. These clients will be vetted by our service providers to ensure they meet these guidelines. Funds distributed will be utilized to support clients most affected by the COVID-19 pandemic with rent, mortgage, utilities, food access and critical transportation.

 

Fulton County United Way will begin accepting funding requests from area human and social service nonprofits in good standing beginning July 6, 2021.  Interested organizations should consult Northern Indiana Community Foundation’s website for guidance on funding intent and application instructions.

 

In April 2020, Lilly Endowment helped Indiana United Ways establish the COVID-19 Economic Relief Initiative with an initial $30 million grant. Lilly Endowment made an additional $15 million grant in March to Indiana United Ways to support the initiative. Both grants are part of Lilly Endowment’s overall grantmaking to help organizations meet COVID-related needs. Since March 2020, Lilly Endowment has made grants totaling more than $210 million to organizations working in Indiana and across the nation as they respond to the pandemic.

DNR recommends removal of bird feeders statewide

The Indiana DNR has received reports of sick and dying songbirds from 15 counties statewide. As the investigation continues, the DNR recommends all Hoosiers remove their birdfeeders statewide.

The 15 counties are Clark, Delaware, Hamilton, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, LaGrange, Lake, Marion, Monroe, Newton, St. Joseph, Union, Washington, and Whitley.

DNR is working with the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (IN ADDL) and the USGS National Wildlife Health Center to determine the birds’ cause of death.

The affected songbirds showed neurological signs of illness as well as eye swelling and crusty discharge.

Several samples have been sent to IN ADDL. All bird samples submitted have tested negative for avian influenza and West Nile virus. Final laboratory diagnostic results are pending.

The following steps are recommended statewide:

• Use the DNR sick/dead wildlife reporting tool at on.IN.gov/sickwildlife to alert DNR staff.
• Stop feeding birds until the mortality event has concluded.
• Clean feeders and baths with a 10% bleach solution.
• Avoid handling birds. If you need to handle birds, wear disposable gloves.
• When removing dead birds, wear disposable gloves and place birds and gloves in a sealable plastic bag to dispose with household trash.
• Keep pets away from sick or dead birds as a precaution.
Additional information will be shared when final diagnostic results are received.

Schnabeltier in Rochester on Indiana's Cheese Trail

A Rochester favorite is on the state's Cheddar Brick Road.

 

A kick-off was held earlier this month at Crystal Springs Creamery in Osceola for the American Dairy Association Indiana's Cheese Trail.  It features 10 dairy farms and creameries across the state.

 

The inaugural trail features stops at Schnabeltier - Rochester, Fair Oaks Farms – Fair Oaks, Heritage Ridge Creamery - Middlebury, Hufford Family Farms – Manchester.

DNR and partners investigating songbird mortalities

Indiana DNR has received reports of sick and dying songbirds from five counties.

 

DNR is working with the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory (IN ADDL) and the USGS National Wildlife Health Center to determine the birds’ cause of death.  The five counties are Monroe, Clark, Jefferson, LaGrange, and Lake.

 

The affected songbirds showed neurological signs of illness as well as eye swelling and crusty discharge.

 

“Several species are being affected,” said Allisyn-Marie Gillet, DNR ornithologist, “including blue jay, American robin, common grackle, Northern cardinal, European starling, and a few others.

 

Gillet said that all bird samples submitted have tested negative for avian influenza and West Nile virus. Final laboratory diagnostic results are pending.

 

The following recommendations are good practice for anyone who experiences sick or dead wild birds on their property:

 

• Use the DNR sick/dead wildlife reporting tool at on.IN.gov/sickwildlife to alert DNR staff.
• Stop feeding birds until the mortality event has concluded.
• Clean feeders and baths with a 10% bleach solution.
• Avoid handling birds. If you need to handle birds, wear disposable gloves.
• When removing dead birds, wear disposable gloves and place birds and gloves in a sealable plastic bag to dispose with household trash.
• Keep pets away from sick or dead birds as a precaution.

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