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Community News Archives for 2022-01

USDA announces Conservation Reserve Program signups for 2022

Agricultural producers and landowners can sign up soon for the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), a cornerstone conservation program offered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and a key tool in the Biden-Harris Administration effort to address climate change and achieve other natural resource benefits. The General CRP signup will run from Jan. 31 to March 11, and the Grassland CRP signup will run from April 4 to May 13. 

 

“We highly encourage farmers, ranchers and private landowners to consider the enrollment options available through CRP,” said Acting Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Director Susan Houston. “Last year, we rolled out a better, bolder program, and we highly encourage you to consider its higher payment rates and other incentives. CRP is another way that we’re putting producers and landowners at the center of climate-smart solutions that generate revenue and benefit our planet.” 

 

Producers and landowners enrolled 4.6 million acres into CRP signups in 2021, including 2.5 million acres in the largest Grassland CRP signup in history. There are currently 22.1 million acres enrolled, and FSA is aiming to reach the 25.5-million-acre cap statutorily set for fiscal year 2022. 

  

CRP Signups 

 

General CRP helps producers and landowners establish long-term, resource-conserving plant species, such as approved grasses or trees, to control soil erosion, improve water quality and enhance wildlife habitat on cropland.? 

 

Meanwhile, Grassland CRP is a working lands program, helping landowners and operators protect grassland, including rangeland and pastureland and certain other lands, while maintaining the areas as working grazing lands. Protecting grasslands contributes positively to the economy of many regions, provides biodiversity of plant and animal populations and provides important carbon sequestration benefits to deliver lasting climate outcomes.  

 

Alongside these programs, producers and landowners can enroll acres in Continuous CRP under the ongoing sign up, which includes projects available through the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) and State Acres for Wildlife Enhancement (SAFE).  

 

Climate Benefits 

 

Last year, FSA enacted a Climate-Smart Practice Incentive for CRP General and Continuous signups, to better target CRP on addressing climate change. This incentive aims to increase carbon sequestration and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. CRP’s climate-smart practices include establishment of trees and permanent grasses, development of wildlife habitat and wetland restoration. The Climate-Smart Practice Incentive is annual, and the amount is based on the benefits of each practice type. 

  

Additionally, in order to better target the program toward climate outcomes, USDA invested $10 million last year in the CRP Monitoring, Assessment and Evaluation (MAE) program to measure and monitor the soil carbon and climate resilience impacts of conservation practices over the life of new CRP contracts. This will enable the agency to further refine the program and practices to provide producers tools for increased climate resilience.  

 

More Information on CRP 

 

Landowners and producers interested in CRP should contact their local USDA Service Center to learn more or to apply for the program -- for General CRP before the March 11 deadline, and for Grassland CRP before the May 13 deadline. Service Center staff continue to work with agricultural producers via phone, email, and other digital tools. Due to the pandemic, some?USDA Service Centers?are open to limited visitors. Additionally, fact sheets and other resources are available at fsa.usda.gov/crp.  

 

Signed into law in 1985, CRP is one of the largest voluntary private-lands conservation programs in the United States. It was originally intended to primarily control soil erosion and potentially stabilize commodity prices by taking marginal lands out of production. The program has evolved over the years, providing many conservation and economic benefits.  

 

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. Under the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to safe, healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit www.usda.gov

Ag Alumni Fish Fry postponed until spring due to COVID-19

The annual Purdue Ag Alumni Fish Fry, originally set for Feb. 4, has been postponed until April 30 due to safety concerns surrounding the current COVID-19 Omicron variant surge in Indiana.

 

Danica Kirkpatrick, executive director of the Purdue Ag Alumni Association, spoke about the difficult decision made by the event planning team.

 

“We became concerned that we could not produce this event safely,” Kirkpatrick said. “We will return to the Indiana State Fairgrounds and will have a wonderful celebration this spring.”

 

Ticket holders who plan to attend the April 30 event will be able to use the tickets they have purchased.

 

Ticket holders who are no longer able to attend the 2022 Fish Fry should email Kirkpatrick at danica@purdue.edu so that a refund can be processed as soon as possible.

 

“We will return to the February dates in 2023,” Kirkpatrick said. “Thank you for understanding, stay safe and healthy, and we’ll see you in April.”


Fulton County Public Library seeks public input at upcoming sessions

The Fulton County Public Library is hosting four community discussions that will help the library build its five-year plan. These sessions will be facilitated by ReThinking Libraries and will last approximately an hour.

Light refreshments will be provided.

All are invited to take part. 

This project is funded in part by a grant from the Fulton County Community Foundation.

Tuesday, January 18 @ 6:00 PM—Aubbee Branch Library

Wednesday, January 19 @ 11:00 AM—Rochester Branch Library

Wednesday, January 19 @ 1:00 PM—Fulton Branch Library

Wednesday, January 19 @ 6:00 PM—Rochester Branch Library 

 

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